Posts Tagged ‘fishing’

ANTLER COLLECTORS REMINDED OF RESTRICTIONS

December 14, 2010

I have been called a “rollover” for the Colorado Division of Wildlife, and worse in the past. What follows has some very serious problems… I’ll respond to any serious questions about my reservations with this latest episode in beast verses man, and Mankind…

GUNNISON, Colo. — The Colorado Division of Wildlife is reminding antler hunters that the collection of shed antlers in the Gunnison Basin is regulated by strict guidelines.

The purpose of the regulations is to protect vulnerable wildlife species, especially Gunnison sage-grouse and mule deer, explained J Wenum, area wildlife manager in Gunnison.

Collecting shed antlers for commercial use has grown significantly during the last decade in the Gunnison area. The activity can disturb Gunnison sage-grouse during their mating period, and also cause unnecessary harassment of deer and elk on winter range. Collectors are cautioned to know the regulations. Violations could result in confiscation of antlers, a $68 fine and five penalty points against hunting and fishing privileges.

“The Colorado Division of Wildlife takes the disturbance of wildlife species during the critical winter period very seriously,” Wenum said.

Over the years, unscrupulous antler collectors have been observed chasing deer on foot and with snowmobiles, searching areas at night, and going onto private land without permission.

Shed antler collection on public lands in Game Management Units 54, 55, 551, 66 and 67 is closed completely from Jan. 1 through March 14 annually. From March 15 through May 15, collecting is prohibited from sunset to 10 a.m. daily.

The regulations were adopted by the Colorado Wildlife Commission and based on a collaborative petition submitted by the Gunnison Basin Sage Grouse Strategic Committee, Gunnison-area sportsmen and shed antler collectors. The DOW worked closely with those groups to develop the regulations.

The period of the first closure (Jan. 1 to March 14) assures that deer herds and Gunnison sage-grouse are not harassed during the difficult winter months. The second closure period (March 15 to May 15) ensures that Gunnison sage-grouse are not disturbed during the critical early morning hours of their mating period.

The closures will be strictly enforced. Collectors are advised to consult official sunset tables and to obtain accurate public lands maps.

For more information, or to report violations or suspicious activity, call the DOW office in Gunnison at (970) 641-7060.

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.


Early Christmas Wish’s…

December 2, 2010

Dear Uncle Fred. I know that you are busy so I figured that I’d get my wish list in early so as not to be too much trouble rounding these neat toys for big boys up for me.

I know, some might not be considered politically correct. But, oh well, when were we ever?

NEW STATE RECORD SMALLMOUTH

November 27, 2010

DENVER, Colo. – Conner Peitsmeyer, 11, of Aurora probably won’t remember the chill of the 35-degree air on the morning of Nov. 12. What he will remember for a long time is catching the new Colorado state record smallmouth bass.

Conner was fishing at Aurora Reservoir with his dad, Michael Peitsmeyer, in the family’s fishing boat that Friday morning. A few days before, Conner had landed his first ‘big fish’ in the same area, a smallmouth that was more than five pounds. But nothing prepared Conner for the 20¾ inch, 6-pound, 8-ounce monster he would pull from the water that morning.

“We had caught quite a few big bass that week, so we knew they were in there,” said Michael. “When he caught that first big one, Conner told me he was shaking, but he wasn’t sure if it was from the cold or from the excitement.”

Conner’s catch eclipses the previous state record smallmouth, a 21-inch, 5-pound, 12-ounce bass caught by Carl Dewey at Navajo Reservoir in 1993.

The bass isn’t the only state record fish caught at Aurora Reservoir this fall. On Oct. 4, 20-year-old Jessica Walton, landed a 43-pound channel catfish at the reservoir east of Denver.

“Aurora Reservoir has ideal forage conditions to produce very large fish,” said Paul Winkle, DOW aquatic biologist who manages the fishery.  “There’s an outstanding population of crayfish and yellow perch, which provides an excellent food source for fish to grow to enormous sizes.”

In the last decade, the DOW has stocked more than 135,000 fish at Aurora Reservoir, including trout, bass, catfish, walleye and wiper, helping to establish the 640-acre reservoir as one of the state’s most popular fisheries.

The youngest of three brothers, Conner said he loves angling so much that he had saved his birthday and Christmas money to buy his own fishing gear – a medium to light St. Croix graphite rod and a Shimano reel spooled with Berkley Trielene XL 6 pound test line.

The DOW issued Conner Peitsmeyer his Master Angler award certificate and patch, and added the record smallmouth bass to the Colorado State Fishing Records.

“Any time someone lands a new state record, it’s exciting for us,” said Greg Gerlich, DOW fisheries chief.  “It’s even more exciting when it is a youngster that pulls in one of these big fish. This is yet another example of how anyone, regardless of age or experience, can have a great day fishing.”

The DOW tracks fish records by weight in 43 different species categories. Potential record-holders must have a valid Colorado fishing license or be under the age of 16. The fish in question must be weighed on a state-certified scale, and a weight receipt must be signed by a person who witnessed the weighing. The fish, before being frozen, gutted or altered in any way, must be examined and identified by a DOW biologist or wildlife manager before an application is submitted.

To view Colorado’s Fishing Records, please visit the DOW’s website at:
http://wildlife.state.co.us/Fishing/AwardsRecords/

To download photos to accompany this story, use the following links:
Conner and Biologist Paul Winkle http://dnr.state.co.us/ImageDBImages/26076.JPG
Conner and his state record smallmouth bass
http://dnr.state.co.us/ImageDBImages/26075.JPG
[Note to broadcasters: Connor's last name is pronounced "PEETZ-my-er." ]

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

Right To Hunt And Fish Amendments Adopted In Three States

November 7, 2010

 

Voters in Tennessee, Arkansas, and South Carolina made a powerful statement on Tuesday by overwhelmingly voting to include National Rifle Association-backed constitutional amendments to protect America’s great, ages-old heritage of hunting and fishing as state constitutional rights.

“The voters have spoken and they have sent a very clear message to anti-hunting groups like the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and PETA: You and your extremist agendas are not welcome in my state,” said NRA-ILA Executive Director Chris Cox. “NRA will continue to lead efforts to pass these amendments across the nation. We must be vigilant because even as we get more sportsmen’s groups to join us in the fight, extremists are pouring hundreds of thousands of dollars into anti-hunting campaigns.”

Tennessee’s Amendment received 90 percent of the vote, followed by South Carolina with 89 percent and Arkansas with 82 percent. The voters in these states appreciate that sportsmen are today’s true conservationists, as their license fees and excise taxes paid on equipment fund the vast majority of wildlife and conservation efforts in the country. Both sportsmen and wildlife were undisputed winners on election night.

Right to Hunt and Fish constitutional amendments are a state-by-state priority for the NRA and will continue at a rapid pace, especially with more pro-Second Amendment and pro-hunting legislators being elected around the country. NRA’s model Right to Hunt and Fish constitutional language, developed over the past five years, has become the standard from which to negotiate with legislators and game and fish professionals. Thirteen states now have these important constitutional protections: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia and Wisconsin.

“Hunting is in America’s DNA. Indeed, it is as old as civilization itself,” concluded Cox. “NRA has long assumed a leadership role but we must all work together to ensure that every resident in every state is able to rest, knowing that their hunting heritage will be there for future generations.”

SOURCE

A day without fishing… Or blogging? Say it isn’t so!

May 8, 2010

Global warming struck my small slice of Wyoming today, and the snow stopped… For a few minutes anyways.

I’m not really much of a cold footer when it comes to fishing. Today though, I simply could not resist. Although I absolutely loved the fishing opportunities that Colorado offered? I never had an active trout stream literally within walking distance of my home.

I set the reloading things aside. The 270 can wait, at least for today… After all, last evening I had loaded up twenty precision rounds of Sierra GameKing. Deer, and Pronghorn are accounted for, and only the Elk loads remain to be loaded, both Accubonds and Partitions. Sometimes the inexpensive out performs the standard of the line. Be that Marlin XL7 Rifles, or Orvis Green Mountain Fly Rods.

The Orvis came out as if by magic, as did my waders, vest, and the various flies that I had tied across this rather extended period of man made global warming, or, as it is known in Wyoming, winter.

Men, and yes, women too have addictions, as noted elsewhere on this blog. They include, but are not limited to; Turkey Hunting, Fly Fishing, Elk Hunting, bass fishing, Fly tying, gun dog work and Upland Game Hunting, shooting of all disciplines, and the list is apparently never ending. Chili cooking addiction is, in particular, a very devastating addiction that get little attention. Entire families get hooked, for generations on Chili Verde and how it is best prepared.

I cleared the recently reduced three feet of snow from before the Ford Ranger. No small feat for a man well over fifty with a bad back, and started the trucks engine… Then I cleared the way onto the road, which, was actually dry pavement thanks to the the City Snow Plow Driver that works for us tax payers… No small feat for that group of Boy Scouts next door that were doing their civic duty clearing off the driveway and sidewalk of that astonishingly well endowed young “lady” that lives next door… Anyways…

I made it down the street that I exist on… I mean live at, to another side road. I progressed as it were, behind yet another tax paid truck driver with a big pusher thingy on the front of the truck to my point of embarkation. Satisfied, I pulled off my ultra light hiking shoes; known in most of the world as sneakers, and white cotton socks. Replacing the with my wool “Not Quite Perfect” full length socks. ( Yes, that is a brand name folks, and they are very good for the price paid! ) Opened up the door of my truck, and the following tax paid truck gave me a dose of global warming Wyoming style…

Any ways… After digging myself, my Fly Rod, and other gear out, I made my way down to Clear Creek.Where I was, uh.. Joined, by other town folks. Actually they were there waiting for me… Brothers of the outdoors!

Nancy said something like; “Don’t you wear your waders on the outside, and with a sinister look in her eye, proceeded to dress me more appropriately… Nooge, a retired Firefighter and Guardsman made the comment that he also might be in need of such training in proper dress. Michael, Donald, and Jimmy were all subjected to Nancey’s expert servicing…

Nancy did ask me something along the lines of “What ya’ think  I need to learn about fishing for flies…”

Preparation for fishing completed, I was asked to cast the first fly. I chose the Nancy Biot Midge pattern, stringed it up, and, drifting it through the eddies, and soon latched up with a decent Hofer Rainbow! Must have went all of  nine inches!

Then I woke up…

Whew! Colorado Division of Wildlfe has been busy!

April 11, 2010

I do try to keep things posted in a timely  manner here with regards to things related to outdoors recreation. Mostly in Colorado, because I know it so well, and Wyoming, because it is like an adventure exploring my new home state. Then, there is my recent re-entry into reloading. My screen netting of Clear Creek here in the new local area… And so on.

So? Read on. This is, after all a compilation.

DENVER, Colo. — The Colorado Division of Wildlife (DOW) is starting its 5-year review of statewide fishing regulations and is asking anglers throughout the state to provide comments and suggestions on regulations and possible changes.

DOW’s aquatic biologists continually evaluate Colorado’s fisheries, pausing every five years to review the fishing regulations with the Colorado Wildlife Commission to ensure that management objectives and recreation needs for anglers are met. The regulations set allowable methods of take, season dates, size requirements and bag limits, as well as statewide rules that apply to individual waters throughout Colorado.

In addition to regulations, DOW biologists will examine biological and social data from state waters. These include fish and creel surveys, research and trend information, water quality issues, stocking activity and angler-satisfaction surveys. This data will be considered in the decision-making process for setting new regulations.

“We have some very interesting feedback in the northeast region regarding our fishing regulations,” said Ken Kehmeier, Senior Aquatic Biologist,” We’ve already heard from folks who’d like to see carp tournaments allowed, bow and spear fishing, and changes to the walleye regulations. These meetings are a great place to hash out ideas on angling with the public and brainstorm ways to make fishing even better for Coloradoans.”

Northeast Region Meetings

Tuesday, April 27              Comfort Inn Fort Morgan, 1409 Barlow Rd., 6:30-8:30 PM

Wednesday, April 28      Sterling Ramada Inn, 22140 E Hwy 6, 6:30-8:30 PM

Tuesday, May 4                                Fort Collins Senior Center, 1200 Raintree Dr., 6:30-8:30 PM

Wednesday, May 5         DOW Denver HQ, 6060 Broadway, Bighorn Room, 6:30-8:30 PM

Timeline for 5-Year Fishing Regulation Process

The DOW requests that most angler comments be received by the end of April. The DOW is also asking for comments from fishing organizations, sportsmen’s groups; water resource managers, including ditch companies, conservancy districts, and state and federal government agencies; land management agencies, local governments and private landowners; and businesses and communities that have an economic stake in fishing activity.

After receiving input from anglers and an internal review, draft regulations will be prepared by July and presented for more public comment. The draft regulations will be sent to the wildlife commission in September for review and more public comment will be allowed at that time. New regulations will be adopted formally in November.

For the northeast region, submit questions or comments to Ken Kehmeier by calling, (970 472-4350), or emailing keh.kehmeier@state.co.us; Statewide-issue comments can also be submitted to Dave Chadwick, (303)291-7174, dave.chadwick@coloradostate.us.

Every year more than 600,000 people buy fishing licenses in Colorado. The state offers are wide variety of angling opportunities. Anglers can fish at warm- and cold-water lakes and reservoirs, in numerous big rivers, and in alpine streams and lakes. Every year, fishing in Colorado generates about $1.2 billion in economic benefits.

ANGLER ROUNDTABLES IN JUNCTION, GLENWOOD, MEEKER, STEAMBOAT AND GRANBY

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo., – The Colorado Division of Wildlife is hosting Angler Roundtables around northwest Colorado to discuss the agency’s five-year review of fishing regulations. Angler Roundtables are open to the public and anyone interested in fishing is encouraged to attend.

Local Angler Roundtables will run from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the following locations:

MeekerThursday, April 22 – Mountain Valley Bank (400 Main Street)

GranbyMonday, April 26 – Granby Community Center (3rd and Jasper)

Glenwood SpringsTuesday, April 27 – Glenwood Springs Community Center (100 Wolfsohn Rd.)

Grand JunctionWednesday, April 28 – Ramada Inn (752 Horizon Dr.)

Steamboat SpringsThursday, April 29 – DOW/USFS Office (925 Weiss Dr.)

Angler Roundtables are public meetings designed to provide people who fish with the opportunity to hear about DOW management and to ask questions or provide suggestions. In addition to discussing regulation changes, anglers can get information or ask questions about local fishing opportunities.

Fishing is an important part of Colorado’s economy. Every year more than 600,000 people buy fishing licenses in Colorado. Fishing generates about $1.2 billion in recreation revenue each year in the state.

After receiving public input, DOW staff will develop draft regulations to present to the Colorado Wildlife Commission in September. Those draft regulations will receive additional public review and Commission discussion before formal adoption by the Commission in November.

FLY FISHING SEMINAR IN SALIDA


SALIDA, Colo. – The Colorado Division of Wildlife will provide a fly fishing class on Sat., April 17, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Salida.

The seminar is geared toward intermediate fly-fisherman and takes place in two sessions – indoor classroom instruction at the Salida DOW office in the morning, followed by “hands-on” fishing instruction on the Arkansas River in the afternoon.

“This class will help people who already have a working knowledge of fly fishing to further fine-tune their skills and make them a more versatile angler,” said Matt Yamashita of the DOW.  “We will cover topics such as reading the water, casting techniques, and various fly presentation styles.”

Participants must furnish their own waders and fly-fishing gear (rods, reels, etc.), and must have a current Colorado fishing license.

The seminar is free.  Class size is limited to12 anglers and pre-registration is required.  Due to fluctuating water levels and wading requirements, this course is not recommended for children.

For more information, or to register, call (719) 227-5200.

The DOW office in Salida is located at 7405 Hwy 50.

The price of an annual fishing license is $26 for Colorado residents.  A one-day license is $9.

JUMBO AND PREWITT RESERVOIRS NOW OPEN TO BOATERS

DENVER, Colo.–The Colorado Division of Wildlife today announced that Jumbo and Prewitt reservoirs are now open for the 2010 boating season.

Jumbo Reservoir, located in Logan County, is open to boating from 6 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. seven days a week through Memorial Day weekend.  Beginning June 1, boating hours will be extended to 9:30 p.m. until the end of the season.   All boats must complete a mandatory on-site inspection for aquatic nuisance species (ANS) prior to entering and upon leaving the reservoir.

Prewitt Reservoir, located in Washington County, is open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week, until the end of the boating season.  All boats are required to complete a mandatory on-site ANS inspection prior to entering the reservoir.

The mandatory watercraft inspections are part of a statewide effort to stop the spread of zebra and quagga mussels, and other ANS in Colorado reservoirs.   In order to ensure inspections run smoothly and lines move quickly, boaters should arrive to inspection sites with their vessels Clean, Drained and Dry.

For a detailed explanation of the “Clean, Drain and Dry” protocol, click here: http://wildlife.state.co.us/WildlifeSpecies/Profiles/InvasiveSpecies/WatercraftCleaning.htm

For more information on zebra and quagga mussels and how to prevent their spread, please visit the DOW’s Web site at:  http://wildlife.state.co.us/WildlifeSpecies/Profiles/InvasiveSpecies/ZebraandQuaggaMussels.htm

SAN LUIS VALLEY BIG-GAME MEETINGS SCHEDULED

MONTE VISTA, Colo. – The Colorado Division of Wildlife has scheduled two public meetings in the San Luis Valley to discuss big game management and license allocations for the 2010 hunting seasons in Game Management Units 68, 681, 682, 76, 79, 791, 80, 81, 82 and 83.

The first meeting is 6:30 p.m., April 15, at the Monte Vista Co-op, at, 1901 E. U.S. Highway 160.

The second meeting is 6:30 p.m., April 20 at the Blanca/Fort Garland Community Center, located about one mile west of Fort Garland on the north side of U.S. Highway 160.

Every year, DOW biologists evaluate big game harvest and population estimates to set license numbers for the seasons.

Brad Weinmeister, terrestrial biologist for the DOW in Monte Vista, will explain proposed license numbers for big game species: deer, elk, bear, pronghorn and moose.

For more information, call Weinmeister at (719)587-6905.

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

Whew!

DOW Insider

March 23, 2010

GUNNISON BASIN BIG GAME LICENSE ALLOCATIONS MEETING SET

GUNNISON, Colo. – The Colorado Division of Wildlife will be holding its big game license recommendation meetings for the Gunnison Basin game management units on March 31 at the Gunnison DOW office, 300 W. New York.

Deer and elk license numbers for the 2010 seasons for Game Management Units 66 and 67 will be discussed starting at 10 a.m. A second meeting to discuss deer and elk license numbers in GMUs 54, 55 and 551 will start at 1 p.m.

For more information, contact the Gunnison DOW office at (970)641-7060.

ANGLERS ASKED FOR INPUT ON FISHING REGULATIONS

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The Colorado Division of Wildlife invites local anglers to participate in “Angler Roundtable” meetings throughout southeastern Colorado.

The DOW re-evaluates state fishing regulations every five years.  These public forums give anglers a chance to provide input to the fishing regulations process and hear the latest information affecting their favorite fishing waters.

“We want to hear from anglers during this process,” said Doug Krieger, senior aquatic biologist for the SE Region. “Colorado’s anglers represent a diverse group who enjoy fishing for everything from catfish to trout. This is a great opportunity for anglers to provide input regarding allowable methods of take, size requirements, and bag limits.”

DOW biologists regularly evaluate fishery management and collect data from state waters. They conduct fish sampling, creel census and angler satisfaction surveys, research studies, review fish stocking strategies, and examine water quality and water quantity. That information will be considered in the decision-making process for setting the new regulations for the five-year period (2011-2015).

Anglers are encouraged to bring suggestions about how DOW can improve the fishing at their favorite lakes and streams.

The forums are in the following locations:

Leadville: April 13, National Mining Museum, 120 W. 9th Street, 6:30 p.m.

Colorado Springs: April 20, Division of Wildlife, 4255 Sinton Rd., 6:30 p.m.

LaJunta: April 21, Thyme Square Soup & Salad, 302 Colorado Ave., 7 p.m.

Lamar: April 22, Division of Wildlife, 2500 S. Main St., 7 p.m.

Trinidad: April 26, Trinidad Jr. College Sullivan Center, 600 Prospect St., 7 p.m.

Westcliffe: April 27, Cliff Lanes Bowling Alley, 25 Main St., 7 p.m.

Pueblo: April 28, Pueblo State Parks Auditorium, 640 Reservoir Rd., 7 p.m.

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

DOW STARTING FIVE-YEAR REVIEW OF FISHING REGULATIONS

March 11, 2010

DENVER, Colo. — The Colorado Division of Wildlife is starting its 5-year review of statewide fishing regulations and is asking anglers throughout the state to provide comments and suggestions on regulations and possible changes.

Regulation planning will be discussed throughout Colorado at “Angler Roundtable” meetings that will begin in late March. Management and research for various waters will also be discussed at the meetings. Dates and locations of those meetings are still being scheduled and will be announced later.

Aquatic biologists continually evaluate fisheries, and every five years the Colorado Wildlife Commission looks at all fishing regulations to ensure that the DOW continues to meet fisheries management objectives and recreational needs of anglers. The regulations set allowable methods of take, season dates, size requirements and bag limits. The regulations include statewide rules that apply to individual waters throughout Colorado.

Besides regulations, DOW biologists will examine biological and social data from state waters. These include fish and creel surveys, research and trend information, water quality issues, stocking activity and angler-satisfaction surveys. That information will be considered in the decision-making process for setting new regulations.

“We actively seek input from anglers during this process,” said Greg Gerlich, aquatic section manager for the DOW. “Colorado’s anglers represent a diverse group who enjoy angling for everything from trout to walleye. We enjoy hearing from anglers and also educating them on how they play a role in management and regulatory decisions.”

Every year more than 600,000 people buy fishing licenses in Colorado. The state offers a wide variety of angling opportunities. Anglers can fish at warm- and cold-water lakes and reservoirs, in numerous big rivers, and in alpine streams and lakes. Every year, fishing in Colorado generates about $1.2 billion in economic benefits.

The DOW requests that angler comments be received by the end of April.

The DOW is also asking for comments from fishing organizations, sportsmen’s groups; water resource managers including ditch companies, conservancy districts, and state and federal government agencies; land management agencies, local governments and private landowners; and businesses and communities that have an economic stake in fishing activity.

In addition to specific suggestions for individual waters, the DOW also wants to hear suggestions on statewide “big picture” issues.

“Colorado has very active associations that are concerned about specific species, such as bass, walleye and trout. We want to hear from those groups. But it’s also important for us to receive comments from individual anglers to get a balance of opinions,” Gerlich said.

After receiving input from anglers and an internal review, draft regulations will be prepared by July and presented for more public comment. The draft regulations will be sent to the wildlife commission in September for review; more public comment will be allowed at that time. New regulations will be adopted formally in November.

The Colorado Division of Wildlife is divided into four regions: northeast, northwest, southeast and southwest. Aquatic biologists in each region are responsible for maintaining waters.

Comments on regulations can be submitted to:
Dave Chadwick, statewide issues, (303)291-7174, dave.chadwick@state.co.us; Southwest Region, John Alves, (719)587-6907, john.alves@state.co.us; Northwest Region, Sherman Hebein, (970)255-6186, sherman.hebein@state.co.us; Southeast Region, Doug Krieger, (719)227-5202, doug.krieger@state.co.us; Northeast Region, Ken Kehmeier, (970)291-4350. ken.kehmeier@state.co.us.

WILDLIFE COMMISSIONER BOB STREETER TO MEET PUBLIC IN NORTHEAST REGION

December 19, 2009

DENVER, Colo. — Commissioner Bob Streeter will hold a public meeting in Fort Collins to discuss the concerns of constituents and wildlife issues facing the plains.  The commissioner, who represents public members, will discuss the deer and elk season structure and any other issues of concern brought by attendees.  Streeter and DOW staff will lead a conversation on regional outreach efforts and how to engage additional non-consumptive users in supporting and contributing to wildlife in Colorado.

Streeter, who lives in eastern Larimer County, is a former wildlife and habitat restoration consultant and has worked in a variety of roles with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, including as assistant director of refuges and wildlife from 1995 to 1998.  He is a former chair of the Larimer County Planning Commission and the Larimer County Open Lands Advisory Board. He also currently serves on the South Platte Roundtable and is the Wildlife Commission representative on the Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) Board.

The Wildlife Commission is a volunteer board that sets regulations and policies for the DOW. There are nine wildlife commissioners who represent five different districts in Colorado. They are appointed from each of the following groups: livestock producers; agricultural or produce growers; sportsmen or outfitters; wildlife organizations; and boards of county commissioners. The remaining three commissioners are appointed from the public at large.

Please join Commissioner Streeter at this meeting:

WHAT:               1313 Meeting with Commissioner Bob Streeter
WHEN:               Wednesday, January 13, 6:30 – 8:30 pm
WHERE:            Fort Collins Senior Center, 1200 Raintree Drive

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

COLORADO DIVISION OF WILDLIFE 2010 CALENDAR NOW AVAILABLE

December 3, 2009

Okay, I know that regular readers know that I am an Outdoorsman. Yes, I hunt with rifle, and front stuffer, and with a stick and string ( My REAL hunting love) before my arm went south.

Few people know though that I also “camera hunt.” Yep, I am a “shutter bug!” I am also a really big fan of the Colorado Division of Wildlife’s  Colorado Outdoors Magazine. It is flat out awesome! Always packed with great tips and advice, and some of the best photography that exist anywhere. In view of the latest assault on freedom and liberty by the FCC? Please take note, that this is only an opinion, and further, that I make no money, or take recompense in any kind from the Colorado Division of Wildlife, any subsidiaries and so on, in any way. I will say this though. If you have an outdoors person in your life? This should make one heck of a gift!

Hint hint hint…

COLORADO DIVISION OF WILDLIFE 2010 CALENDAR NOW AVAILABLE

Looking for a “wild” Christmas gift for the sportsman or wildlife enthusiast in your family? For the first time ever, Colorado Outdoors– the official bimonthly magazine of the Colorado Division of Wildlife–proudly presents the “2010 Colorado Division of Wildlife Calendar.”

Featuring the same stunning photography found in Colorado Outdoors magazine, the 2010 calendar provides hunting and fishing season information, as well as detailed descriptions on watchable wildlife happenings and festivals around the state.

Calendars may be purchased online (http://wildlife.state.co.us/wildlifestore) or by visiting your local Division of Wildlife office. And at $6.95, they are a steal. Limited numbers are available. Get them while they last.

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.


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