Posts Tagged ‘Hunting’

ELK HUNTING 101 IN DENVER SEPT. 27

September 15, 2012

DENVER — Colorado Parks and Wildlife will host a basic seminar for hunting elk in Colorado as a part of our Hunter Outreach Program efforts to educate and involve new hunters in the sport. This seminar will cover the fundamentals of habits/habitat, hunting tactics and techniques and provide a good beginning for the novice elk hunter.  Registration is limited to 75 participants. Join the fastest growing family of hunters in Colorado for an educational evening.

WHO: Everyone

WHEN: Thursday Sept. 27, from 6:30 to 9 PM

WHERE: Hunter Education Building, Colorado Parks and Wildlife, 6060 Broadway, Denver, CO 80216

COST: No cost

SIGN UP: To register please email wildlife.neoutreach@state.co.us or call 303-291-7804 and leave a message with name(s), address and phone number to register.

For more information on hunting in Colorado, go to:

http://wildlife.state.co.us/Hunting/Pages/Hunting.aspx

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

4TH SEASON DATE: HIGH-QUALITY HUNTS IN MEEKER

September 15, 2012

MEEKER, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife and the Miller Creek Ranch in Meeker are offering big-game hunters an opportunity to apply for a limited number of private property, high-quality elk and mule deer hunts beginning Nov. 3.

Interested hunters must submit a written application by 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012 to:

Colorado Parks and Wildlife – Meeker Office
Attn:  Bailey Franklin/Special Miller Creek Ranch Hunts
PO Box 1181, Meeker CO 81641

The application can be found at: http://parks.state.co.us/SiteCollectionImages/parks/Misc/MeekerHuntApplication.pdf

Nine hunts will be available to hunters who have already drawn limited deer and elk licenses for Game Management Unit 23 during the 2012 big game hunting seasons. In addition, one public bull elk hunt will be available to any big game hunter that plans to purchase an unlimited, over-the-counter bull elk license for the third rifle season in 2012.

“This is a rare, high-quality private land hunting experience,” said District Wildlife Manager Bailey Franklin. “We encourage sportsmen to take advantage of this chance to enjoy a once-in-a-lifetime hunt.”

The unique opportunity developed through a working relationship between Colorado Parks and Wildlife and Miller Creek Ranch landowner Richard Bachmann.

As part of their efforts in a large-scale big game habitat protection and improvement project, local wildlife managers reached a mutual agreement with Bachmann to set aside a perpetual conservation easement on his 3,100-acre ranch property, located in GMU 23.

A portion of the agreement stipulates that a limited amount of public access for mule deer and elk hunting will be made available annually and will be cooperatively implemented by the agency, Bachman and property manager Joe Collins.

The Miller Creek Ranch is within the White River mule deer and elk herd units, two of the largest big game populations in the state of Colorado. The ranch features a variety of habitat, including high elevation aspen and conifer forest, mountain shrub lands and lower elevation pinyon-juniper woodland and sagebrush.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is accepting applications until the Oct. 10 deadline. The hunts are open to all eligible hunters; however, preference will be given to youth and military veterans that apply. There is no cost associated with the application. The following hunts will be available and hunters should be specific about which of these hunting seasons/opportunities they are interested and eligible to apply for:

ONE UNGUIDED ANTLERED/BUCK DEER HUNT ON MILLER CREEK RANCH

Third regular rifle season – Nov. 3 through Nov. 11 2012
OR
Fourth limited rifle season – Nov. 14 through Nov. 18 2012

To be eligible, applicants must have drawn a limited deer license in either:
– DM012O3R
– DM012O4R
– DE011P3R

Applicant must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in buck mule deer hunt in the application.

One hunter will be selected from a pool of eligible applicants to hunt a buck deer during only one of the two potential buck deer hunt dates specifically listed above for 2012.

ONE UNGUIDED ANTLERLESS/DOE DEER HUNT ON MILLER CREEK RANCH
Third regular rifle season – Nov. 3 through Nov. 11 2012

Applicant must have drawn a limited antlerless deer license in either:
– DF012O3R
– DE011P3R

Applicants must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in doe mule deer hunt in the application.

One hunter will be selected from a pool of eligible applicants to hunt a doe deer during the hunt dates specifically listed above for 2012.

ONE UNGUIDED ANTLERED/BULL ELK HUNT ON MILLER CREEK RANCH

Third regular OTC rifle season – Nov. 3 through Nov. 11 2012
OR
Fourth limited rifle season – Nov. 14 through Nov. 18 2012

All hunters are eligible to apply for this public bull elk hunt during the third rifle season.

Applicants that have drawn a limited, either sex license for EE012O4R are also eligible to apply for this bull elk hunt but would be restricted to the fourth, limited rifle season.

Applicant must confirm that they are planning to purchase an over-the-counter bull elk license for the third rifle elk season, or have already drawn a fourth rifle limited elk license.

Applicants must indicate interest in the bull elk hunt in application.

One hunter from the pool of eligible applicants will be selected to hunt a bull elk during only one of the two potential bull elk hunt dates specifically listed above for 2012.

7 UNGUIDED COW ELK HUNTS ON MILLER CREEK RANCH

- Third regular OTC rifle season – Nov. 3 through Nov. 11 2012
– Fourth limited rifle season – Nov. 14 through Nov. 18 2012
– Latter portion of the late, private-land-only rifle season:  Oct. 24 through Nov. 11 2012
– Late rifle December PLO cow elk season – Hunt 1:  Dec. 1 through Dec. 6 2012
– Late rifle December PLO cow elk season – Hunt 2:  Dec. 7 through Dec. 12 2012
– Late rifle December PLO cow elk season – Hunt 3:  Dec. 13 through Dec. 18 2012

In order to be eligible to apply for one of the seven public cow elk hunts, applicant must have drawn a limited antlerless or either-sex elk license in either:
– EF012O3R
– EE012O4R
– EF011P5R
– EF023P5R

Applicant must confirm eligibility and must specifically indicate which of the cow elk hunts listed above that they are applying for in the application.

CPW will select seven hunters from pool of eligible applicants to hunt cow elk during any of the six potential cow elk hunt dates specifically listed above for 2012.

The ten hunters will be notified by mail soon after the deadline. In addition, those selected will receive specific dates and details from Colorado Parks and Wildlife, including a hunt packet detailing special travel restrictions and hunting access rules.

For more information or questions, call Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Meeker office at 970-878-6090.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife was created by the merger of Colorado State Parks and the Colorado Division of Wildlife, two nationally recognized leaders in conservation, outdoor recreation and wildlife management. Colorado Parks and Wildlife manages 42 state parks, all of Colorado’s wildlife, more than 300 state wildlife areas and a host of recreational programs.

To learn more about Colorado’s state parks, please see: http://www.parks.state.co.us

To learn more about Colorado’s wildlife programs, please see: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

The Addiction Series continues: Oh, to be young again!

May 1, 2012

PROGRAM HELPS YOUNG HUNTERS BAG FIRST BIRDS

MEEKER, Colo. – Three lucky young hunters from northwest Colorado bagged their first turkeys after being selected to participate in Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s 2012 Hunter Outreach Program’s Youth Turkey Hunt. The trio found success after spending some chilly, late April weekends enjoying a private land hunt and learning hunting strategies from their Colorado Parks and Wildlife mentors.

Ten-year-old Henry Musser of Meeker, 13-year-old Antoinette Dorris of Rangely and 10-year-old Tagerty Poole of Rifle were selected from a group of novice youth hunters that had recently completed their hunter education classes.

“To see the smiles on their faces and the fun they were having was fantastic,” said District Wildlife Manager Bailey Franklin, who coordinates the turkey hunt each year. “It’s truly a highlight of my career as a Colorado game warden.”

The focus of the Hunter Outreach Program is to pair young hunters with experienced veterans to help build knowledge and confidence, which is critical for beginning hunters. District Wildlife Managers Jon Wangnild, Mike Swaro and Terry Wygant were the primary guides for the youth participants again this year. The skilled wildlife officers taught the youngsters various hunting techniques including the use of calls to locate “gobblers” and how to identify turkey sign in the field.

Hunting access was provided by the Jensen Family Ranch properties, which are leased and managed by Rocky and Sparky Pappas and Travis Flaherty, K/K Ranch owners Bill and Ross Wheeler, Seven Lakes Lodge owner and professional golfer Greg Norman and landowners Lonnie and Todd Shults.

“We had increased interest and support from several landowners from Meeker this year which is very encouraging,” said Franklin. “Without them, these once-in-a-lifetime hunting opportunities would not be possible, and we are very grateful.”

In addition to the landowners, ranch employees donated their time to help make the hunts successful. Travis Flaherty of Jensen Family Ranch properties/Nine Mile Guest Ranch scouted and located turkey flocks and served as a guide for Swaro and one of the young hunters.  Brett Harvey and Rich Krauss of K/K-Wheeler Ranch, along with Tony Decker and Robert King of Seven Lakes Lodge, also provided valuable assistance.

To ensure that they received the best information and training, the aspiring turkey hunters were required to go through an additional half-day orientation where they learned more about hunter safety and ethics, state laws, wild turkey biology and hunting techniques

They received additional firearm training at the Meeker Sportsman’s Club shooting range, where they honed their shotgun shooting skills. The time and facilities were donated by the club, a long-time supporter of the Hunter Outreach Programs.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife loaned the young hunters youth model shotguns and turkey hunting equipment to participants that did not already have their own. The kids also received hunting gear, prizes and food for the hunt.

After successfully harvesting their mature gobblers, the youngsters learned how to properly field dress and care for their birds.

Although turkey hunting has seen a rapid growth in popularity across the country, the overall number of hunters and anglers nationwide has declined every year since 1990, according to research conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reasons include a lack of places to hunt and fish busy lifestyles and a lack of mentorship from an older, experienced hunter.

The Hunter Outreach Program provides skills seminars, clinics, mentored hunts and online articles and information as a means to encourage the public to learn and apply their new skills in hunting and angling.

“Our goal is to expose novice hunters of all ages to a quality experience and give them basic skills so they will continue with the sport into the future,” said Statewide Hunting Outreach Coordinator Jim Bulger. “Without the help of private landowners and other stakeholders, we’d be unable to provide that experience.”

Landowners who are interested in supporting Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s 2013 youth turkey hunting program or any other  youth hunting program in northwestern Colorado are encouraged to  call the Meeker office at 970-878-6090.

Youth and parents interested in learning more about youth hunting opportunities can also call the Meeker office and request an application for upcoming youth hunts.

For more information about the Hunter Outreach Program, please visit: http://wildlife.state.co.us/Hunting/HunterOutreach/Pages/HunterOutreach.aspx

Colorado Parks and Wildlife was created by the merger of Colorado State Parks and the Colorado Division of Wildlife, two nationally recognized leaders in conservation, outdoor recreation and wildlife management. Colorado Parks and Wildlife manages 42 state parks, all of Colorado’s wildlife, more than 300 state wildlife areas and a host of recreational programs.

To learn more about Colorado’s state parks, please see: http://www.parks.state.co.us

To learn more about Colorado’s wildlife programs, please see: http://wildlife.state.co.us

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EDITORS NOTE – For photos of the event, please visit the following links:

Ten-year-old Henry Musser of Meeker poses with his first gobbler and his proud father John Musser.
http://dowlegacyapps.state.co.us/apps/ImageDB/ImageDownload.aspx?ImageId=26719&ImageSize=Print&ImageType=JPG

Thirteen-year-old Antoinette Dorris of Rangely poses with her first turkey.
http://dowlegacyapps.state.co.us/apps/ImageDB/ImageDownload.aspx?ImageId=26721&ImageSize=Print&ImageType=jpg

Ten-year-old Tagerty Poole of Rifle with his gobbler and proud grandma Sunny Stead.
http://dowlegacyapps.state.co.us/apps/ImageDB/ImageDownload.aspx?ImageId=26720&ImageSize=Print&ImageType=JPG

District Wildlife Manager Mike Swaro (left) poses with Travis Flaherty and 10-year-old Tagerty Poole.
http://dowlegacyapps.state.co.us/apps/ImageDB/ImageDownload.aspx?ImageId=26723&ImageSize=Print&ImageType=jpg

Officers, youths and their parents pose proudly for the camera at Bel-Aire State Wildlife Area.
http://dowlegacyapps.state.co.us/apps/ImageDB/ImageDownload.aspx?ImageId=26722&ImageSize=Print&ImageType=JPG

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

Colorado Hunting Updates

March 4, 2012

I’m combining these various articles, enjoy!

GET READY TO HUNT COLORADO

DENVER – The Colorado Parks and Wildlife 2012 Big Game Hunting brochure is now available and limited license applications are being accepted for this fall’s big-game hunts. License applications for deer, elk, pronghorn, moose, sheep, goat and bear are due Tuesday, April 3.

For 2012, Colorado Parks and Wildlife has updated the interactive online version of the big game brochure that features videos with online application tips and hunting tips to use in the field. New tables in the brochure also help hunters easily identify units where licenses are valid and whether a hunter can hold more than one license at a time.

This year, Colorado Parks and Wildlife is again encouraging hunters to use the secure internet portal to submit their limited license applications. About 75 percent of hunters applied online in 2011, up from 64 percent in 2010.

Henrietta Turner, Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s license administration manager, said that last year, her staff called more than 15,000 individuals to address more than 45,000 errors or problems with their big game applications. Many of the errors would have resulted in the rejection of the license application. Only 25 of those calls went to hunters who submitted their application through the web.

“Our online system is easy, convenient and it keeps you from making some of the more common mistakes that could affect success in the drawing,” Turner said. “The web site also has a wealth of resources for hunters looking to plan a memorable hunt.”

Seven Parks and Wildlife offices, including Denver, Grand Junction, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins, Hot Sulphur Springs and Montrose offer internet terminals for hunters to use. In addition, the secure application site can be accessed through any public internet terminal.

The 2012 brochure also explains some significant changes to Colorado’s late youth elk hunting regulations. Since 2000, 12- to 17-year-olds with an unfilled elk tag could take advantage of cow elk hunting opportunities in any unit offering a late-season hunt. These late hunts were extremely successful in encouraging youth participation, but some areas around Craig, Meeker and Steamboat Springs experienced high levels of hunting pressure. Changes to the program this year will ensure hunting pressure is more evenly distributed.

“When we were over our elk population objective, we committed to landowners that we would develop innovative ways of reducing elk numbers and elk conflict,” said Ron Velarde, Regional Manager for northwest Colorado. “We’ve accomplished that and we found a great way to encourage youth participation. Now that we’re getting close to population objectives, we want to be sure these young hunters have a quality experience in the field if they take advantage of these late hunts.”

Colorado Parks and Wildlife hunt planners are available again this year to help hunters who have application questions or are looking for areas to hunt. Hunt planners can be reached Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mountain time at 303-291-7526 (303-291-PLAN).

Hunters ages 18 to 64 are reminded that they must have a $10 Habitat Stamp prior to applying for or purchasing a hunting or fishing license in Colorado. Only one stamp is required per hunter per year. A lifetime Habitat Stamp is available for $300.

The Colorado Wildlife Habitat Stamp program was initiated by sportsmen and established by the Colorado legislature in 2005. Proceeds from the Habitat Stamp have helped conserve more than 124,000 acres of wildlife habitat and secure more than 54,000 acres of new public hunting and fishing access.

Hunters born on or after Jan. 1, 1949 are also reminded that they must complete an approved state or provincial hunter education course prior to applying for a hunting license in Colorado. Since the hunter education requirement was imposed in 1970, hunting accidents have significantly declined in the state.

The interactive version of the brochure can be accessed at www.bit.ly/COBigGame2012

A .pdf version of the 2012 Colorado Big Game brochure can be viewed here:
http://wildlife.state.co.us/RulesRegs/RegulationsBrochures/Pages/BigGame.aspx

A complete list of upcoming hunter education classes can be found at http://wildlife.state.co.us/Hunting/HunterEducation/CourseCalendar/

TURKEY HUNTING 101 MARCH 14

DENVER – Just in time for the March 15 sale of unlimited turkey tags, Colorado Parks and Wildlife is offering a Turkey Hunting 101.  This basic seminar on hunting wild turkeys will provide basic instruction on gear, calls, habitat, and habitats, as well as tips and techniques for the novice to take to the field in April.  Join us and learn how to bag your bird for the table.

WHAT: Turkey Hunting 101

WHO: Everyone interested in learning how to hunt turkeys

WHEN: Wed., March 14 from 6:30 p.m.  to 9 p.m.

WHERE: Hunter Education Building, Colorado Parks and Wildlife, 6060 Broadway, Denver

COST: No cost

SIGN UP: To register please email wildlife.neoutreach@state.co.us or call 303-291-7804 and leave a message with name(s), address and phone number to register.  Seminar is limited to 100 participants.To find out more about turkey hunting, go to:

http://wildlife.state.co.us/HUNTING/TURKEY/

ELK HUNTING 101 MARCH 12

DENVER – Are you planning on hunting elk for the first time in 2012 and are looking for information on where to hunt, how to draw, and how to best prepare for this unique hunting experience? Join us for an introduction to elk hunting in Colorado. This seminar is limited to 75 people so register early!

WHO: Anyone

WHEN: Tuesday, March 12 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30p.m.

WHERE: Colorado Parks and Wildlife, Hunter Education Building, 6060 Broadway, Denver

COST: No cost

SIGN UP: To register please email wildlife.neoutreach@state.co.us or call 303-291-7804 and leave a message with name(s), address and phone number.

To find out more about hunting elk, visit Elk Hunting University at:

http://wildlife.state.co.us/Hunting/ElkHuntingUniversity

BEAR HUNTING WORKSHOP PLANNED IN MONTROSE


MONTROSE, Colo. — If you’ve ever wanted to hunt bears or if you want to improve your chances of harvesting one, plan to attend a workshop sponsored by Colorado Parks and Wildlife on March 10 in Montrose.

Tony Bonacquista, a district wildlife manager and experienced bear hunter, will lead the presentation on hunting Colorado’s black bears. He’ll discuss bear biology, hunting tactics, field dressing, rules and regulations, and human-bear conflict issues.

“Bears are very challenging to hunt, but hunters who know where to look and how to hunt them can improve their success rates,” Bonacquista said.

Bear populations are healthy throughout the Montrose area of western Colorado. During hunting season in the early fall, bears are eating for up to 20 hours per day. They concentrate on acorns and berries, high-energy food sources they need to pack on the pounds in preparation for hibernation.

Cost for the workshop is $10 which includes lunch. To register, call the Montrose Parks and Wildlife office at 970-252-6000. The class will be limited to 30 people.

What: Bear hunting workshop When: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., March 10 Where: Colorado Parks and Wildlife, 2300 S. Townsend Ave., in Montrose.
For more information about Colorado’s black bears, see: http://wildlife.state.co.us/WildlifeSpecies/LivingWithWildlife/Mammals/Pages/LivingWithBearsL1.aspx .

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

 

DENVER AREA HUNTERS INVITED TO BIG GAME SEMINARS

March 1, 2012

DENVER – Are you planning on hunting big game in 2012 and have questions about how to get a license? Join us for an introduction to big-game licenses in Colorado.  Learn about how the draw and preference point system works, how to determine your odds of drawing a limited license, what is the difference between limited and over-the-counter licenses, when you can have more than one big-game license, and much more.

These free seminars are excellent for any hunter that wants to better understand how big game licensing works in Colorado and needs help planning a hunt. Colorado Parks and Wildlife staff will be on hand to assist you in filling out your applications and to answer any of your questions after the seminar.

PARKER, Wed., March 14:
The Wildlife Experience, 10035 South Peoria St., Parker, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. (75 attendees max.)

DENVER, Tues., March 20:
Colorado Parks and Wildlife, Hunter Education Building, 6060 Broadway, Denver, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. (75 attendees max.)

DENVER, Fri., March 30:
Colorado Parks and Wildlife, Hunter Education Building, 6060 Broadway, Denver, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. (75 attendees max.)

SIGN UP: To register please email wildlife.neoutreach@state.co.us or call 303-291-7804 and leave a message with name(s), address and phone number.

For more information on big game hunting in Colorado, go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us/Hunting/BigGame/

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

I would highly recommend attending one of these meetings, as the new format..? Well, let’s just say that they succeeded in fixing something that wasn’t broken…

 

How Deer Think; Democrats et al

December 21, 2011

Ted Nugent, rock star and avid bow hunter from Michigan , was being
interviewed by a liberal journalist, an animal rights activist. The
discussion came around to deer hunting. The journalist asked, ‘What do you
think is the last thought in the head of a deer before you shoot him? Is it,
‘Are you my friend?’ or is it ‘Are you the one who killed my brother?

Nugent replied, ‘Deer aren’t capable of that kind of thinking. All they care
about is, what am I going to eat next, who am I going to screw next, and can
I run fast enough to get away. They are very much like the Democrats in
Congress.’

The interview ended

MONTE VISTA MARKSMANSHIP CLASS OFFERED

October 17, 2011

MONTE VISTA, Colo. – Hunters looking to brush up on their marksmanship skills heading into the upcoming rifle seasons can get some pointers at a two-day class in Monte Vista on Thursday, Oct. 20 and Friday, Oct. 21. The Colorado Parks and Wildlife marksmanship class will include information on ballistics, effect of wind, adjustments for terrain and a range training session.

“This class is perfect for the intermediate hunter,” explained Rick Basagoitia, Area Wildlife Manager and course instructor. “We want people who have experience hunting but might be looking for that next level of training to get them familiar with the dynamics of marksmanship.”

There is a $20 registration fee and the class is limited to ten participants. To register for the class or to get more information, contact Colorado Parks and Wildlife in Monte Vista at 719-587-6900.

The Thursday, Oct. 20 session will run from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and be held at the Monte Vista office of Colorado Parks and Wildlife, 0722 South Road 1 East. The second session will be held at an area shooting range from 8 a.m. to noon on Friday, Oct. 21. Participants will need to bring their rifle and 40 rounds of ammunition for the range session. The range session will include custom ballistics charting for participants’ rifles. As well participants will learn practice techniques and various shooting positions.

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

HIGH-QUALITY HUNTS ANNOUNCED IN MEEKER

September 12, 2011

Folks, this is nothing short of incredible! Perhaps if time allows I will run a series about hunting in this very area for more than twenty years…

MEEKER, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife, in cooperation with two local landowners, is  offering big-game hunters  an opportunity to apply for a limited number of high-quality elk and mule deer hunts on private ranch land in the Meeker area.

A total of 27 hunts will be available to hunters who have already drawn limited deer and elk licenses for Game Management Unit 23 for the coming big-game seasons. Hunters who are interested in applying for these hunts must do so in writing by October 3.

“This is truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for hunters,” said District Wildlife Manager Bailey Franklin. “We encourage everyone to take advantage of this chance to enjoy this rare, high-quality private land hunting experience.”

This unusual opportunity grew out of the working relationship between local rancher Mike Grady, the Klinglesmith family and wildlife managers with Colorado Parks and Wildlife. Local wildlife managers are spearheading a large-scale big-game habitat improvement effort in the region. Grady and the Klinglesmith family have placed conservation easements on more than 13,000 acres of important big-game habitat in the area and are participating in the habitat improvement program.

The properties are within the White River mule deer and elk herd units, which are the two largest big-game populations in the state of Colorado. Habitat varies on the 13,000-acre properties, consisting of high elevation aspen forest, mountain shrub lands and lower elevation pinyon-juniper woodland and sagebrush.

A limited amount of public access for mule deer and elk hunting was negotiated as part of the perpetual conservation easement agreements on both the LK Ranch and the Grady properties, which are jointly managed as a big-game recreational hunting enterprise. Some limited form of public access will now occur annually on these properties.

Between now and October 3, the Meeker Service Center of Colorado Parks and Wildlife will be accepting applications from hunters with valid tags for GMU 23. These hunts are open to all eligible hunters, though special preference will be given to youth and military veterans. There is no cost associated with the application.

The following hunts will be available:

FOUR UNGUIDED BUCK MULE DEER HUNTS
–  Second regular rifle season – 10/22 through 10/30/2011
– Applicant must have drawn a limited deer license for DM012O2R
– Applicant must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in buck deer hunts
– Five day access – Days are selected by landowners and the Meeker District Wildlife Manager

FOUR UNGUIDED BULL ELK HUNTS
- Fourth regular rifle season – 11/16 to 11/20/2011
– Applicant must have drawn a limited elk license for EE012O4R
– Applicant must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in the bull elk hunt

19 UNGUIDED LATE-SEASON COW ELK HUNTS
- First Cow Season – 11/25 to 11/29/2011
– Five hunters will be selected
– Applicant must have drawn a limited license, or purchase a leftover license for hunt code EF011P5R
– Applicant must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in the first season cow elk hunt

- Second Cow season - 12/3 to 12/7/2011
– Five hunters will be selected
– Applicant must have drawn a limited license or purchase a leftover license for hunt code EF023P5R
– Applicant must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in the second season cow elk hunt

- Third Cow season – 12/11 to 12/15/2011
– Five hunters will be selected
– Applicant must have drawn a limited license or purchase a leftover license for hunt
code EF023P5R
– Applicant must confirm eligibility and note interest in the third cow elk hunt

- Fourth Cow Season – 12/19 to 12/23/2011
– Four hunters will be selected
– Applicant must have drawn a limited license or purchase a leftover license for hunt code EF023P5R
– Applicant must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in the fourth cow elk hunt

To be considered for these hunting opportunities, eligible hunters must submit an application to:

Colorado Parks & Wildlife – Meeker Service Center Attn:  Bailey Franklin/Special LK Ranch Hunts PO Box 1181, Meeker CO 81641
All applications must be received by 5 p.m. Monday, October 3, 2011.

Applications can be printed from our website at the following link: http://wildlife.state.co.us/SiteCollectionDocuments/DOW/Hunting/BigGame/LKRanchSpecialHuntApplication.pdf

Hunters who have qualified will receive notification and specific dates and details in early October.

All selected hunters will be required to follow travel restrictions and access rules designated on a LK Ranch public hunt map.

Please call the Colorado Parks and Wildlife office in Meeker with any questions, at (970) 878-6090.

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For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

MAN SENTENCED IN MOOSE CASE

April 23, 2011

MEEKER, Colo. – A hunter from Highlands Ranch pleaded guilty April 1 to a felony and several misdemeanors in a case that highlights a growing concern for Colorado wildlife managers — hunters who fail to correctly identify big game animals.

After a three-month long investigation by the Colorado Division of Wildlife, Joel D. Eady, 30, was charged with willful destruction of wildlife – a Class 5 felony, as well as hunting out of season, illegal possession of wildlife and failing to properly care for a harvested animal. The investigation showed that Eady failed to report the incident in a timely manner. This incident happened during a hunting trip in October 2010 in the Missouri Creek Basin, about 30 miles east of Meeker.

“The biggest concern here is that Mr. Eady never reported this to us,” said District Wildlife Manager and lead investigator Jon Wangnild.  “We understand that mistakes happen and we will usually be more lenient with someone who reports an accident right away, but failing to report this incident turned a careless mistake into a felony.”

Following Eady’s guilty plea in Rio Blanco County District Court, Judge Gail Nichols sentenced Eady to three years of supervised probation and a $5,177 fine. The conviction means Eady may face a lifetime suspension of his hunting privileges pending a review by a Division of Wildlife Hearing Examiner.

According to witnesses, Eady admitted to them that he had mistakenly shot the cow moose after misidentifying it as an elk.  He also told those at the scene that he would turn himself in, but never did.

“There is a tremendous amount of information and education about the proper identification of game animals available to hunters,” Wangnild said.  “The Division has a great website where you can get as much information as you need to be a safe and legal hunter. A hunter should never, ever pull the trigger without being certain of the target. But if an accident occurs, the best thing to do is to let us know right away.”

Wangnild said some hunters may not be aware that moose may live in the same area where elk are found so the Division has conducted an extensive education and outreach program to help hunters distinguish between moose and elk, including letters and emails sent to hunters, and videos and illustrations that can be found on the Division’s website.

If a mistake does occur, hunters are encouraged to inform Division authorities immediately. In many cases, wildlife officers may use discretion in making determinations about the facts of a given case. If a hunter does not report an accident and abandons the animal, it can lead to serious charges and fines, as well as lifetime suspension of hunting privileges.

The Division reminds hunters that it is their responsibility to educate themselves as much as possible before hunting and encourage investing in a good pair of binoculars to help identify game. Using a rifle scope to identify game is strongly discouraged because it could create a situation where you may end up pointing your rifle at a person.

In poor light or thick cover, elk can be confused with moose. But on close examination, the differences are stark enough that anyone with basic knowledge of wildlife and a good pair of binoculars should be able to avoid mistaking one species for the other.

A bull moose has a large, dark brown or black body, a bulbous snout and a beard, or bell, under its throat.  One of the most striking differences between a bull moose and a bull elk are its antlers. Bull moose have palmated or flattened antlers with tines, while a bull elk does not. The cow moose is similar in appearance to a bull minus the antlers.

A bull elk has a slender snout, pale yellow rump with darker legs, and chestnut brown neck. It has brow tines that grow off of the main antler beam. A cow elk is similar in appearance to a bull elk but also does not have antlers.

A moose calf can look very similar to an antlerless elk, so using binoculars is critical to identify other distinguishing characteristics.

The Division relies on tips and public information to help enforce hunting regulations, and citizens are encouraged to report illegal activity to Operation Game Thief, a Colorado Division of Wildlife program which rewards citizens who turn in poachers. You can call us toll-free within Colorado at 1-877-COLO-OGT. Verizon cell phone users can dial #OGT.

Callers to Operation Game Thief do not have to reveal their names or testify in court. A reward of $500 is offered for information on cases involving big game or endangered species, while $250 is offered for information on turkey and $100 for fishing and small game cases. Rewards of up to $1,000 are available for information about flagrant violations. Rewards are paid for information which leads to an arrest or a citation being issued.

For more information on how to distinguish moose from elk, please see:
http://wildlife.state.co.us/NR/rdonlyres/5F4B2585-97CF-4F9D-9F67-1520201B74D/0/elkmooseflyer.pdf

Moose/Elk Comparison Video:
http://wildlife.state.co.us/NR/rdonlyres/9C0E127C-EE75-4127-8AE5-2A981A9D5D0/0/moosevselk.wmv

To learn more about Operation Game Thief, please see:
http://wildlife.state.co.us/RulesRegs/LawEnforcement/OperationGameThief/

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

Bears beware..?

April 17, 2011

Back in the day… Alright, a little background is indicated. Animal rights wacko jobs succeeded in getting the voters of Colorado to pass a law that forbid spring bear hunting. For all the wrong headed reasons.

It didn’t help sometime later when..? A Division of Wildlife officer testified at a trial that there had never been a documented case of a black bear harming a human…

In any case the results were as expected. Human bear conflicts rose to unprecedented levels, including a woman being killed, and partially consumed by bears. Now, it appears that the truth is coming back to haunt the people of Colorado. Read on…

DENVER (AP) – Bears beware – Colorado lawmakers worried about the animals’ growing population are talking about giving wildlife officials more say over when bears can be hunted.

A proposal set for its first hearing Monday would repeal a 1992 voter-approved initiative that prohibits hunting bears from March 1 to Sept. 1 and give the state Division of Wildlife authority to expand hunting dates.

Voters overwhelmingly approved the initiative amid concern that female bears were being hunted in the spring, when they are taking care of their cubs. The initiative also banned hunting bears with dogs and baiting bears with food to kill them. The bill sponsored by Rep. J. Paul Brown would not eliminate those provisions.

Brown, a lawmaker from southwestern Colorado, said he’s concerned that the animals are becoming less afraid of people.

~snip~

FULL STORY



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